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20091130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2009 1:00am EST
, what we are going to talk about today is "america for sale," which is in the first week of sales. we just got notified it will come november 1st, be on "the new york times" best-seller list debuting at number 11. so we are very pleased with the success of the book, and thank you for coming out today. we will have about half an hour on want to present the book is about and then take some questions from you at the end of that time. i wrote a "america for sale" as a clarion call for action. the whole idea is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 1:00am EST
stretched america's frontiers to the pacific ocean. back to the battle of trenton for a moment. as i said, monroe didn't cross the delaware on the same boat as washington. he crossed earlier with a squad that landed on the jersey shore to the north of trenton and circled behind the town while washington landed with his troops on the riverside below the town. now what makes trenton so important is that the british had almost won the war by christmas of 1776. their troops had overrun on the island, new york, westchester and most of new jersey. thousands of american troops had deserted and the british had chased the remnants of washington's army across new jersey over the delaware and in to pennsylvania. white coats were in sight of the american capital. congress had fled to baltimore and began debating terms of could the chelation -- capitulation. unless washington could come up with a miracle, and he chose a young college student, lieutenant james monroe, to help me cut miracle happen. they all crossed the delaware during a blinding snowstorm on christmas night only six months after we had
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 2:00pm EST
position because now lehman brothers is a small or mid-sized investment big now citigroup, bank of america and the large massive behemoths commercial banks with mass of deposits. remember, an investment bank likely men brothers does not take and deposits. it invests money around the world on the sell stocks and bonds but does not have people money in a bank the way citigroup, bank of america. they have over $1 trillion of real money in those banks and those are savings accounts, checking account, paychecks, but we started to see 2004 through 2006 was a very clear increase in leverage. lehman brothers increasing the debt to try to compete with the big boys. we got deeper and deeper it involved into businesses and investments that were very difficult to move as the years went on and leaving got deeper and deeper into the storage business. and retain this book "a colossal failure of common sense" i reached out to so many people, 150 people up and down the firm. i will never forget in those days september, october, november and especially december when people found out i was writing this book
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 5:45pm EST
model for young women. i think she's what america needs right now. she's just great all the way around. i just love her. >> when you say you like her conservative values, what do you mean by that? >> specifically, she believes in the constitution. the abortion issue. i'm against abortion. just good american values. you know, i just love that about her. she's a real person, she's one of us. she's not from washington d.c. she is not anything -- she doesn't act like anything she's not. she is just herself and i really like that. >> my name is nancy from dayton, ohio. >> have you ever seen her in person before? >> no, no. so i'm really in anxious and excited about having the book signed. >> have you read the book yet? >> no, i haven't read it yet. i watch fox news a lot and they've had lots of interviews and stuff like that on there. i've been watching those and enjoying those, just watch in her. so, i'm real excited. >> what is it that you like about sarah palin? >> just about everything. i'm like her. i like her conservative values. she's one of us. like she says, she's not ever try to b
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 7:30am EST
america. she's our voice. >> why is that, can you explain for about that. >> everything she says, pertains to the middle people, she is dynamic, she is for middle america. she is... knows the issues. and i think that she is going to represent us more than we apt. >> when you say middle america, what do you mean. >> just the commoners. people who don't know where to go, to get information. don't know where to go, to have representation. i think that she will be their voice. >> and did you vote for mccain-palin in '08. >> by all means, i did. i did. >> so why do you think they didn't win the election? >> i think there was too much outside influence and i don't think that she was given the opportunity. i think there were too many people that were strategizing and kept her from speaking out. >> a number of people i talked to seem to be upset about how she is treated by the media. would you agree and what would you say about that. >> i think she was treated unfairly. i think that she should have been able to speak more openly, and, have her own platform. >> and are you a lifelong republican? >>
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 9:30am EST
of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 21, 2009. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable patrick j. leahy, a senator from the state of vermont, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: robert c. byrd, presidet pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president, on this saturday, the senate in one of its unusual sessions, it's very good to see one of the more senior members of the senate presiding over the senate. a lot of presiding is left to the more junior members, and it's indicative of the teamwork of the senator from vermont, one of the most senior members of the senate, the chairman of the judiciary committee, and someone who is always there when there is a need for something to be done, as is today to open the senate. i have such fond memorie
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 9:00am EST
, there is no group in america, probably not even the jews themselves, which cites more passionately with israel and the war being waged against it by the arab muslim world and which is more steadfast in upholding israel's right to defend itself against its sworn enemies than the so-called religious right. yet instead of forging the pluto alliance for this community, jewish liberals look for ways to justify their refusal to do so. at the same time, perfectly willing to make common cause for the so-called mainline protestant denominations despite the fact that unfriendliness and even outright hostility to israel have become pervasive in that sector of the christian world. a similar situation exists in the strictly political realm here although poll data show self-described conservatives and self-described republicans sympathizing with israel in much greater proportions than liberals self-described liberals that is, and self-described democrats. for example, in a pew survey taken early this year, 60 percent of conservatives sided with israel against a person with the palestinians. whereas a compar
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2009 11:00am EST
's a quote from the story. in a few short decades, america underwent, i think, a fantastic transformation in politics, society and the culture. and i think most people wanted what had happened and who were they at the end of this period. in the decades following the revolution. before the revolution, america had been a collection of british colonies composed of some 2 million subjects, hobbled along the atlantic coast 3000 miles from the centers of civilization. european outpost so to speak whose cultural focus was still not the metropolitan center of the empire. by 1815, following the second war with great britain which is often referred to as a second war of independence independence, these insignificant problems had become a single giant, in a republic with nearly 10 million citizens, many of whom had already spilled over the appellations into the western territories. a cultural focus of this new, huge expansive nation was no longer a broad. it was instead directed inward at its own boundless possibilities. americans knew they were grand experiment of democracy, but they were competent
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 11:00am EST
of america to verify this information? if we knew the street addresses and have pictures and prices somebody ought to be able to go and look in the window are not on the door and see what is on the other side. how many people did the united states have been a country of about 30 million people to verify these 550 places, the answer was zero. so we were totally reliant on this group of highly conflicted exiles. that was all i needed to hear to have serious doubts at the validity of this information upon which we ultimately went to war with, i think, disaster consequence. .. >> if people are trying to get involved and they see that this government seems broken and does not work they get cynical said on top of that asking about "the new york times" max wrangle said he is not read about the existence of that but the newspapers in the country and of those go down they will learn of local problems to get them involved so how the system seems not to be working and the decline of the press what is your comments on those two aspects? >> what i have been discussing is declining citizenship plays a ver
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 7:00am EST
generation. that's why this museum is such an important part of who we are as a people in america. and that's why that legacy was handed off to my brothers and me, influenced all of us, everyone of us served in the military. not because we're more patriotic than the next-door neighbor, but it was part of who we are. it was part of who my parents were. every one of my uncles served in world war ii. the media today is full of stories about how desperate the situation is in afghanistan. i had brought with me for a five different newspapers, all of which have a story here on page one or about how bad things are in afghanistan. you can take the word afghanistan out of the article and two years ago the word would have been iraq. well, guess what? they won the war in iraq. soldiers, sailors, airmen, guardsmen and marine in the united states of america won that war. and yet you would not know that from the media, because as soon as the war turned around they stopped covering it. and today all the bad news is coming out of afghanistan. i would like to remind young people who didn't have that blessin
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 10:30am EST
is known for miss america. i quote the mayor of mississippi's home town, some people say why do you bother as my students would say, why do we need to know this man's name? this is something to confuse us and distract us? he is later in the state legislature and actively endorses and supports segregation and later at the time of meredith's and roland, september 30th, 1962, he sends four trusted people in state government as representatives and one of them is john klein. unless you know people are opposing this all their life. people who watch miss america grow up, another example. this is my favorite little underpining story of the book, during world war ii there was a black man at the university of mississippi who was part of the military unit being trained, he took classes as a regular citizen. he was fine. i am going to dump and they all connected. 1950, and 50 one. there is a controversy by suggesting the university should admit blacks to graduate programs. when he graduates, the following summer, 1951, he is invited by aaron henry, to speak to the national naacp meeting in atlanta. he
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 10:15am EST
political characters. john kennedy and richard nixon were two of the most brilliant political minds america produced in the '60s. nixon was on the national ticket five times and won four of the five times, and last i checked that's one of the best batting averages of anybody who's run for the american presidency. and, of course, john kennedy becoming the first and only roman catholic president in american history is an interesting story in and of itself. secondly, it was an extraordinarily close election. kennedy won by just a tick or two over 100,000 votes out of the tens of millions that were cast, so it was extraordinarily close. it was also, i argue, really the first modern campaign when you think about pollsters, you think about use of media, you think of mass buying of advertising. and when you think about religion as a political force, you add owl -- all those things together, and many things we take for granted today in many ways began in that 1960 election, so i think it's the beginning of modern political campaigns. but it was also what i call the lahr value stage of the religious
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 10:00pm EST
in the united states of america. a very audacious objective with brilliantly executed jeans. she then spent the rest of her life trying to convince the local governments miami-dade county and miami beach to develop the ordinances and other necessary legal mechanisms to protect this a national historic district. unfortunately she died three years before the full realization of her ever. but now there is a st. i believe it is tenth st. which is named for barber. eyesight her because she is the kind of person and that i believe all americans can be if they have a sufficient amount of internal self-confidence and a willingness to acquire the competencies' to be an effective citizen. this book, it "america the owner's manual" is devoted to preparing all americans for active and effective and honorable citizenship. i have defined and in this is totally my doing, but what are the 10 essentials skills of effective citizenship? barbara had most of those skills. she had the skills through her experience in marketing with a knowing the customer and how to influence the customer because of her backgrou
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 11:00pm EST
of the and coburn-- manderville takes part in a gentleman's agreement. in early america under the culture deference reappears because of business logic or you have these cartels and they have elaborate cartels were they had commissions and they would hire a commissioner and fire people from individual will roads were undercutting prices and at the same time, curiously vanderbilt himself by the end of this light is rising in social stature, so he has, he has taken on a business that this sort of inclined towards gentlemanly and agreements because of the nature of the business but he himself is becoming more and more gentlemanly himself. toward the end of this life is personality, his demeanor was much more refined than it was when he was a young steve vote camp said. it is a personal business parallel and then jay gould end jim this, rung, brash young upstarts and they are doing things like telling about secret deals to the press. they are deliberately trying to insult and demean the commodore one thing and he becomes sort of a obsessed with them, even though they are railroad, the erie was never in
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 8:00am EST
. 70% think their children are going to inherit a worse america than them. a majority. that is what is going on. that is the anger and frustration that the book explores. the idea of what went wrong and how to fix it. this is the most important -- i do this at the end because i have an audience. who has kids or grandkids between the ages you are? you don't have any. who has kids between the ages of ten and 18 or children between 10, and 18? raise your hand. this you will want to write down. i will go through it very quickly. of all the things that are in this book this is how to keep your kids happy and healthy. this is not just a book about politics or economics. it is quality of life. you have got to have dinner with your children five nights a week or more because that tells them that they are the most important things in your life. more important than business or social. if you are not having dinner with your kids, is that your dad? yes. you are going to tell me as i go through this whether it is a check or a minus for you. does your dad have dinner with you? >> he works late. >
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 8:00pm EST
to inherit a worse america than them. a majority. that's what's going on right now. that's the anger and frustration that the book explores. the idea of what went wrong, and then how to fix it. because i have an audience, who has kids or grand kids? you are a child. you don't have kids. who has kids between the ages of 10 or 18 or grandchildren between 10 and 18. this is what you are going to want to write down. i'm going to go through it quickly. this is not just a book about politics or economics. it's about quality life. number one, you have to have dinner with your children five nights a week or more. because that tells them that they are the most important thing in your life. more important than business, social. if you are not having dinner with your kids, without your dad right there, yeah. you are going to tell me whether it's a check ormers for you. does your dad have dinner five weeks a night or more? >> no, he works late. >> okay. are you in high school. okay. it's 0-1. he's going to regret coming here. number two, to take your children to church or synagogue once a week.
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 7:00am EST
minds and america produced in the 1960s. nixon was on the national ticket five times, and won four out of the five times. the last i checked that's a pretty good batting average is. of course, john kennedy to come in the first and only roman catholic president in american history is a very interesting story in and of itself that it was an extraordinarily close election. kennedy won the election by just a tick or two over 100,000 votes out of the tens of millions that were cast. it was extraordinarily close. it was also really the first modern campaign when you think about pollsters, you think about use of media. you think of mass buying of advertising. and when you think about religion as a political force, you add all those together and many things we take for granted in our races today, began in mid- 1960 election. i think it's the beginning of modern political presidential campaigns. but it was also what i call the larva stage of the religious right in the united states. if you look at who the players were among conservative protestants in 1960, you see some of the leading lights of
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 1:00pm EST
asked about gay was in 1965. the question was america has many different types of people in it. we'd like to know whether you think each of these different kinds of people is more harmful or helpful to american life or don't you think they harm things one way or the other. homosexuals, 70% more harmful. is it always wrong? yes, said 70%. how about adopting children 1977. this is when in need of brian was leading a crusade on this. they should not be allowed to adopt children, 77%. how about gay teachers in your school? 66% opposed that. suppose your child was involved in the gay relationship. 82% said they'd be very unhappy as parents to learn about that. what about homosexuality on television. 55% in 1989 were opposed to that. and finally, the first question on gay marriage came in 1994 and 62% were opposed to it. how far have we come? we kind of knew, i think, that we were going to come a long way on this issue as early as night he 98. because one of the best polling questions ever asked on the subject was, do you think that by 2025 gay marriage will be legal in the united states
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 4:00pm EST
and in many -- and not to, i mean, america's not free of any responsibility in pakistan's lack of development by supporting military dictatorships and what not. so the conversations with the elite were too easily predictable, if you will. and i think that when i first arrived in pakistan, a woman o said to me, a very conspiracy-hawking anti-american woman -- >> host: your sponsor, by the way. >> guest: the irony of that, of course. she said, there's no way that you, you know, there's no way that you is going to understand pakistan because you don't speak the language, you don't dress locally, you don't ever leave islamabad. a year later when i would rather speak with the tea boys at my office than the other fellows who were working at this institute, and she said, she came up to me and said there's no way you can be a journalist. you speak urdu, you dress locally, so you must be doing something else. >> host: wherever there's plumbing the cia does get blamed. [laughter] i think it essentially was right, nick. sometimes word fails us, vocabulary doesn't reach. but you could call
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 7:45am EST
times both on the old days and lightly on air america. which by the way just launched a new website today. air america.com. i am on live from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. so you can stream them. we still need a station here in south florida but at least you can stream and listen to it in podcast the next day. but were not here to talk about that. maybe another they will talk about getting good progress arroyo back in south florida again. i do not know how he had time to write this book. because this man is the busiest men i know. i refer to them on the air as my favorite activist vicky is to give my go to guy. when i need to know what protests are happening, where there is an action. people standing up to the powers that be, and for we the people. i know i can go to david swanson and find a. is a cofounder of after downing street.org, of democrats.com and of course the blogs regulate also at david swanson.org. and i read, anytime i get an e-mail from david swanson, it's one of the first ones i open because i know there's good information there. this guy walks the walk. when he says that he mea
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 11:00am EST
like to offer my help in any way should the opportunity present itself. rural america is near and dear to my heart and i would love to contribute to this field of research. these are some of the responses that we received about this book. it is clear that it touched a nerve and it should. because if we are ever going to have a conversation and get serious about small-town america it has to start somewhere. let me lay out some of the background to what we see as the issue. why it matters, what in many ways is a typical small town. and what we can sort of do going forward into the future. from 1980 to 2,000, over 809 metropolitan counties like the one we are in lost 10% or more of their population to migration. this is not natural decrease. this is people actually leaving. between 2000, and 2,005, over 800 rural counties lost 10% or more of their population again and in those same counties there were more deaths than births. the median age in these places had also risen pretty dramatically. that would lead us to conclude that the people who are leaving our young. in most cases although w
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 12:00pm EST
, exploring the trail across america. she worked on projects with the nebraska humanities council, organized the first nebraska literature festival and served on the board for the nebraska center for the books. her studies in early nebraska history and in lewis and clark lead her to a search of documents related to the upper louisiana territory where lewis served as governor where he died. from discoveries and she made, she presented case for a new theory as to the cause of loosest death. she also maintains a website, death of merriweather lewis.com and a blog as the facts related to mistry. please join me in welcoming kira gale. [applause] >> thank you very much. very pleased to see such a large attendance. tony reminded me that just at this time 200 years ago today, lewis was writing up. it was the last day of his life and that was at dusk. because this is such a serious topic, i felt that i did need to prepare this as a written statement, but i will try my best to read it well and then we can go into questions. it is a 30 minute talk. i would like to thank the southern book festival and t
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 10:15pm EST
their religious part of their message but early on they were one of the strongest anti-catholic voices in america and they went all in in in the end they worked with the nixon campaign against him so i will cover the two basic things i learned as we go through that campaign. i'm going to read a couple of passages some point you to three scenes and we will see how far we get that one has to do with billy graham's work on behalf of nixon and kennedy. the second one is a vignette from kennedy's used in speech where there was this crisis in the campaign greifeld lucky heads is the confronted a group of protestant ministers and went to houston and the last one is set in nashville, tennessee where one of the most prominent clergymen, baxter was an icon in the church of christ preached an anti-catholic sermon and hattie congressman rebutter this armand immediately after was delivered which you can imagine both had front-page stories on monday, just the average is violation of all kinds of southern taboos and rebutting an iconic on his own pulpit was quite extraordinarily so i will probably do that one.
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 6:30pm EST
represents most of the things the left in this country want to change about america. they don't like her forthright christianity. they don't like the fact that she is not a member of the feminist establishment in fact she disagrees with a lot of the shibboleths of mainstream feminism. they don't like that she is representing the people who are kind of left out of the obama revolution. joe plummer of the world, tito the builders. these are people that do not have graduate degrees in semiotics from elite western, eastern universities. >> host: we will but the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen for our guest, matthew continetti, who has written his book on sarah palin, "the persecution of sarah palin." we are talking more specifically that the media, the subtitle is how the elite media tried to bring down a rising star. so you talk about these rumors and lies and gave examples. who were the biggest offenders in your view? >> guest: there were quite a few. i think in the case of "the new york times" actually ran the alaskan independence party and if on the front pages. all of the main
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 7:00pm EST
are as the people in america. and that is why that legacy was handed off to my brothers and me influence everyone of us who served in the military. not because we are more patriotic than the next door neighbor but it was part of who we are and it was part of who my parents were. everyone of my uncle served in world war ii. the media today is full of stories about how desperate the situation is in afghanistan. i brought with me for five different newspapers all of which have a story either on page 1 are on about how bad things are in afghanistan. you can take the word afghanistan out of the article in two years ago the war within iraq. well, guess what? they won the war in iraq, the soldiers, airmen, guards in marines one that war and yet you would not know that from the media because as soon as the war turned around stop covering at. today all the bad news is coming out of afghanistan. i would like to remind young people who didn't have that blessing that i had of growing up with parents from the greatest generation, that in world war ii, and i went back in shepp because i knew i was going to be
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2009 9:00pm EST
as secession from the union and military defense of the confederate states of america was necessary to achieve that goal. these are all reasonable assumptions. they have been made by historians for generations. but let's also assume that the raid on harpers ferry was the last we ever heard of john brown. let's assume that he was shot and killed during the fighting in harpers ferry as he nearly was. or wenched by the mob that was hungering for vengeance after he was captured. as he nearly was. or the governor wise that convened a court-martial and condemned him to death within hours of his capture. wise said wanted to do that very thing that derive in harpers ferry to late. let's assume in other words there was no trial in charles town, no magistrate court, no indictment, no jury, no appeal to the supreme court of appeals in richmond. if that had been the case brown would never have had an opportunity to address the court. he could not have made the statements quoted over and over in newspaper reports. reprinted in newspapers all over the united states and later celebrated by emerson and others
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 8:00am EST
jerusalem, london and philadelphia, shaped america. days gone by, william f. buckley jr. is a beautifully written autobiography by the founder of the american conservative movement. ethnic america pleaded no by thomas stole, our foremost black intellectual examines some of the ethnic groups, jewish, of rich, german, african-american, why some have a greater impact than others. let me be clear about one thing. a book is a book is a book. it is not a snippet or a scrap or a fragment. a book contains thousands of words, hundreds of pages, which permit the author to develop their early his ideas and his arguments or his characters in a novel. a book doesn't have to be printed on paper. the success of audio books proves that. i would like to say a few complimentary words about the kindle, amazon's electronic reader. the kendall is about the size of a book. it weighs less than a pound and can hold more than 200 books and offers access to several hundred thousand titles at about $10 a pop. but i must confess, i prefer the printed and bound book. there is something tactile and titillating about h
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 5:00pm EST
bankruptcy at 1:45 a.m. in the morning. merrill lynch and then sold to banc of america, and aig, i had just finished writing the front page story, was now teetering. it was the new domino list was actually had not been focused on on that time. and i got home and it was about 2:30 in the morning, and i was excited is the wrong word, freaked out is probably closer to the word, and wanted to talk to somebody, anybody about what had just happened. i couldn't even believe what had happened and i sort of had a front-row seat for most of the weekend, because i had been working the phones trying to figure out the story. and so of course the only person i could talk to was someone sleeping which was my wife whom i woke up and was none too happy to hear about any of this. i'm not sure she thought was the interesting or that she cared. and of course to me this was all so dramatic and i told her the whole story and i said you know, it's like a movie, and she is a literary agent and she sort of looked at me for half a second before rolling over and she looked and said no, it is like a book, andrew, and
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 10:00am EST
america's wars. of which they are getting too many. [applause] >> he will pass among you recruiting right and left. what is happening now that is kind of interesting from within the military, and i began life in a room in the cadet hospital at west point where i was delivered by a future surgeon general of the army, who had not been told about the navels. i did not have the repairs made. surprised should always be offered, or offered anyway. but we are at each area's position in the world. we are not really needed, and it used to be just as an idea that united states was something quite remarkable. and now i wonder, that we've been crowded over. and it was -- there's a photograph of, in this new book that i have published, have nothing but photographs of myself which is highly satisfactory. [laughter] >> and perhaps a bit overdone, you know? as a younger man, i went with a fellow writer, always competitive, and he saw that picture of me which they have run on the cover of the book. and he said i didn't know you were a male model. and i said yes, yes, yes, of course they appear to says a m
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2009 5:30am EST
that she represents most of the things that the left in this country want to change about america. they do not like her forthright christianity. they do not like the fact that she is not a member of the feminist establishment. in fact she disagrees with much of mainstream feminism. they do not like that she is representing the people who are left out of the obama revolution. the job a plumber -- joe the plubmer's of the worlds. people without elite scholarships and agrees. host: we are talking with matthew continetti on his new book, "the persecution of sarah palin," in which you talk about some of these rumors and lies. who were the biggest offenders? oguest: there were quite a few. "the new york times brandy issue of the alaskan independence party on its front pages. if you go to the museum -- newseum and look at the front pages of the nation's newspapers in 2008, it was filled with the pregnancy of her eldest daughter. this does not strike me as front-page news, certainly not something to be fronted without any consideration of the fact that it has on the family, the girl, or that it ha
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 8:00pm EST
political figure in america could have lived up to. so lyndon johnson spends out, since the final days of his presidency and of his life living in fell long shadow of the tragedy of november 22nd, 1963. let me stop there. what i would like to do before we take questions and answers and if you have a question we have a c-span microphone so we will ask that you wait until the microphone our lives. but before we get there one announcement, and that is why i obviously want you to read the book. it's very important that he read the book. i want to point out the history channel has done a wonderful to hour documentary that is based on the book which really captures a lot of the issues and personalities involved. the producer of the documentary is over here, anthony. stand up for a second. [applause] anthony i keep telling and then he needs to change his first name. anthony won an emmy a few years ago and when i was anthony my first name would be any award winning producer and my middle name would be anthony but he likes anthony said he sticks with that, but i think anthony did a brilliant jo
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 11:00pm EST
and for most of that time, he also said america's military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere. and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings of agent passed on they would have carried the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to the expedition. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation things to his warnings he was a pretty effective agent it has to be said. and then there is also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy, and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he makes snakes seem like a model of rectitude and chameleons, chameleons look good, ideals of consistency compared with wilkinson. and i simply refer to him as an artist, in the words of frederick tracks and turner he blessed the most consummate artist in trees in the nation has ever possessed. rollover, benedict arnold, here comes james wilkinson. and i shall also apologize because i re
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2009 7:00am EST
was taken to be united states territory. they moved down to just about there and america -- the united states' line was there. and it's effectively about 65 miles. now, you could have had war with no trouble at all. indeed, in october, 1806, wilkinson was discussing with his second in command, thomas cushing and at that moment the fate of the united states was in his hands if they had made the attack, the army would have been engaged, war would have broken out and the militia would have supported burr coming down the mississippi. burr certainly intended to take new orleans, whether it was a huge angry rebellious french population waiting to welcome him, waiting to give him gold and guns. ostensibly he was going to go to vera cruz to invade mexico but who knows? who knows? and on october the 8th, while wilkinson was talking to his -- talking to his second command, a young man came in with a letter from burr. and that really was the moment at which wilkinson had to decide was he going to be loyal it off jefferson? or was he going to be loyal to his lying treacherous friend, aaron burr? i
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 10:15am EST
: the senator from oregon. mr. wyden: madam president, even though america has the best doctors and the best nurses, our nation spends too much on health care for what it gets. because the problem in american health care will not cure itself, i rise in support of this motion to proceed, beginning the debate about how to fix american health care. before i lay out the many provisions in majority leader reid's bill that constitute real reform, i want to talk for just a couple of minutes about how the senate can come together, democrats and republicans, to fix american health care. i've had a chance to visit with almost every member of the senate in their office on this issue, to listen to them. and it's very clear to me, madam president, that both democrats and republicans have valid points. i believe my party is absolutely right in saying that you cannot fix american health care unless all americans get good-quality, affordable coverage. if you don't cover everybody with that kind of coverage, what happens is those who are uninsured shift their bills to the insured folks, who are already getti
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 12:00am EST
separate worlds. something like 40 percent of the profits in america are now being made on wall street. >> of course in new york city it is an outstanding number because it is not predicated. there are all these other agencies. they come in and stamp value by deciding that these assets are worth the certain amount. states buy it. individuals hear about it from their local bankers. so basically this infiltrates the entire system. >> i remember, back in my state people are really struggling. people are losing their jobs. their income is going down. the economy is doing really good. year after year, this was really astounding. year after year we heard from the bush administration that from their perspective the economy was doing great. explain to me how they could believe the economy was doing great with the middle class was collapsing and we were getting closer and closer and closer to the edge of a major global financial crisis. >> because for them it was great, and that's the problem. 2006 was the record year of bonuses on wall street. between 2006 and 2007 foreclosures in this country
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 2:00pm EST
typically best of america. -- missed the mark. not all givers are well situated to make these choices. some of our more than others. let me show you some pictures. i have done a lot of surveys over the years and i did this in 2001 and the bars represent the yield the ratio you are willing to pay for it. this is the yield on gifts from different kinds of givers i claim the overall it is about 20% less but for some kinds of givers it is substantially less or substantially more. and it turns out over various surveys, it is the extended family, i don't mean to keep criticism on grandparents' but grandparents and aunt & uncle tend to do the worst and significant others tend to do quite well matched with their recipients preference is. friends and parents tend to do pretty well as well but the folks who are in the extended families so going from lee sufficient to most, aunt & uncle grandparents, cousins. but then siblings, parents and spouses and significant others are doing quite well. why is this? go back to the ideas from economic theory we know ourselves pretty well and others who are in freq
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 9:00am EST
's. today, tom chan expens spends to months in china importing fireworks to america. >> steve roberts, author of "from every end of the earth," thanks so much. >> history professor steven g gillon, chronicles the hours after the kennedy assassination and the transfer of the presidency topline done johnson. mr. gillon uses recently classified sources to chronicle the first 24 hours after the assassination. barnes & noble in new york city hosts the event. >> when you write a question like this, the first question that you have to answer is do we really need another book about the kennedy assassination, is there anything new to be said about the assassination of president kennedy, are there new materials that are -- that have suddenly become available, that have not been available for the past 46 years, that allow us to see these events in a different light and obviously, my answer to that question is yes, for very selfish purposes. most of the books, the vast majority of books and you could fill a small library with books and articles that have been written about the assassination, they
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 9:15am EST
areas in the whole of north america. and in this case, it was the people who decided they wouldn't tolerate this any longer. so the missions from the nickel factory had actually leached away almost everything. it was just visit there blackrock, but the people begin getting fertilizer and spreading under sprinkling it on the rocks that they get support from their local government, and now it is beautiful. >> we have a question in about three minutes. >> well you have to wait about five minutes. [laughter] [applause] >> i can't stop in three minutes. are we in a hurry? must be stopped exactly on time? thank you. thank you. thank you. so if you have to go, you have to go. but i'm not going to be back here for ages, and i really have stuff to share. [laughter] >> and i had played guitar for another 10 minutes. so if that's okay with all of you. [applause] >> so now if you go, you can not only see that it's got trees that could have wild animals come back. the falcon had been locally extinct for 50 years and that's another story in the back. they gave me a feather from one of the two
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 8:00am EST
-- it would pass all other sports in america, which it has done. so somehow or other, and he got very -- i called it to his attention, the supreme court librarian took care of him pretty promptly and one day watching a football game, when there was a break or halftime, he said what do you think would happen if they had instant replay in the supreme court? and we agreed that we thought what would happen, they'd find a retired judge, john madden, and they would after a while, at the end of -- instead of -- at the end of every half-hour, the court would adjourn for 15 minutes and john madden, judge, would conduct a chalk talk, and then eventually, two or three or four other justices would become superstars and heroes, and then those two or three ar four justices would determine it's in the public interest to change the meeting time of the court from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and at any rate -- and his extension is that once you started having cameras in the courtrooms, it wasn't very long until you had instant replay. next question. >> i've got one. we kind skirted on it. you don't seem to give
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2009 2:15pm EST
yourvet.org. maine leads unh am and it is the number 1 jewelry store in america am and andy, every kiss begins with kay. >> yes, it does. >> we can singh it if you like. >> i agree with you on that one. >> and no schenscher nan begans and that is the best one and right here on comcast sportsnet. 24-subpoena and r.j. toman and twice in the 3rd quarter. and it is the wildcats that have the play off sides future on the line. and jellison in the ball game. and shawn jellison. up to the line of scrimmage. >> i think you get the 1st down there. >> and they are going to move the chains. and that is what unh has got to do. >> they have to find a way to get the tough yards and at some point. they need rj toman to make a throw down. >> yes, they needed the first down and they got it. >> jellison with it. >> and toman is going long and he has got it open. and j.t. wright had the ball and couldn't hang on to it. it is slightly under thrown. >> i am screaming he is open. and he was standing there. and now, the safety had rolled over the top and see it here. here is the flea flicker. and this ball is under
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 7:00am EST
in america could have lived up to. lyndon johnson spins out, spends the final days of his presidency and of his life living in the long shadow of the tragedy of november 22, 1963. let me stop there. what i would like to do, before we take questions and answers, if you have a question, we have a c-span microphone so we will ask that you wait until the microphone arrives. but before we get to there, i'd want to make one announcement, and that is i obvious he wanted to read a book that it is very important that you read the book. i want to point out the history channel has done a wonderful two-hour documentary that's based on the book, which really captures a lot of the issues and personalities involved. the producer of that to our document is over here. anthony, stand up for a second. [applause] >> i keep telling anthony that he needs to change his first name. anthony wanted any. a fugitive. and i was anthony my first thing would be any a hundred emmy award winning producer. but he like any piece of the sticks with that. but i think that anthony did a brilliant job in this document and
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 12:00am EST
such as the national association of secretaries of state and the national council of state of legislatures in america and legislative exchange council. hans took a law degree at vanderbilt and received bachelor's and political science from m.i.t.. plays wellcome hans. [applause] >> i am a lawyer but i did not go to harvard. we used to refer harvard as the little red schoolhouse down the road. [laughter] i have to agree with a lot of things that were said this morning for chick-fil-a when theresa was talking about how horrible the federal election campaign act is at an difficult it is for an ordinary person to run for office. in his outline many problems he also talks about the restrictions on third parties caused by a very difficult ballot access laws implemented by the state. he complains about the federal public funding program which was put in place 30 years ago and points out the problems with those states like wisconsin and that put the in-state versions of public funding for legislative candidates. those public funding programs have not achieved any of the suppose the purposes of campaign finan
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2009 7:00pm EST
for civil rights. he provided expertise and advice for enforcing voting rape and the help america vote act of 2002. his articles have a part in "the wall street journal." he has testified before stating congressional committees and has been presentation to organizations as the national, the federalist society, national council for state legislatures and the american legislative exchange council. hans took a lot agree at vanderbilt university. he received his bachelor's in political science from mit. he is welcome hans von spakovsky. [applause] >> so i am a lawyer, but i didn't go to harvard. as i can make some points? we used to refer to harvard when i was at mit as the little red schoolhouse down the road. last [laughter] i have to agree with a lot of things said here this morning particularly when teresa was talking about how horrible the federal campaign act is and how confusing it is and how difficult it is for an ordinary person to run for office. in his new book, the professor outlines many of these problems. he also talks about many of the restrictions on third parties caused by ver
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2009 10:00pm EST
and forcing the voting rights act and the help america about act of 2002. articles of appeared in "the wall street journal", weekly standard among others and has testified before state and congressional committees and has made presentations to organizations such as the national association of secretaries of state, the national council of state legislatures and the legislative exchange council and took a lot decreased and received his bachelor's of political science from m.i.t.. [applause] >> i am a lawyer but i did not go to harvard parker does that give me points too. [laughter] we used to refer to harvard as a little red schoolhouse down the road. [laughter] i agree with a lot of things that were said this morning projector the winter recess was talking about how horrible the federal election campaign act did owe typical the makes for an ordinary person to run for office. many of these problems also the restrictions and third-party skied-- caused by ballot implemented laws and he also complains about the federal public funding per gram which was put in place 30 years ago and points sell t
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2009 11:00am EST
by the gay and lesbian transgender community to basically perpetrate that lifestyle on the youth of america? >> guest: well, a couple of things they're. it's not really a lifestyle to get who you are. nobody is trying to perpetrate it on anybody. they are just trying to allow it to be free and equal. and the story that matt gayness didn't matter, and aaron mckinney's confession he actually said it did matter. that's how they singled him out. they chosen specifically because they assume that he was gay. it's a stereotype of a gay man being weak or vulnerable or whatever. really those people just need to read the trial transcript and the confession. go see the levee project. go see the laramie project 10 years later where it is specifically addressed why they chose matt. yes, it was going to be a robbery of a gay man pic that's exactly how they addressed it. >> host: wilma, santa cruz, california, you are on with author judy shepard commack good morning, thank you. i am going to be playing you in the laramie project 10 years later here in santa cruz, california, on october 12. and although we
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